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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities found in the catalog.

The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities

The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities

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Published by Division of Waste Management, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O. [distributor] in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Criticality (Nuclear engineering),
  • Uranium -- Migration.,
  • Low level radioactive waste disposal facilities -- Environmental aspects.

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsToran, L. E., U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Division of Waste Management., Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Paginationv.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15483113M

    criticality both during handling and after disposal of the waste. Currently, there are three operating LLW disposal facilities: Envirocare, Barnwell, and Richland. All these facilities are located in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Agreement States and are regulated by their respective state: Utah, South Carolina, and Washington. Thorium is of potential interest because it may occur in higher concentrations than uranium in typical uranium ores and typically occurs in higher concentrations in the waste rock and tailings. Two published studies (Correa et al., ; Kochhann et al., ) investigated the uptake and toxicity of a soluble form of thorium (thorium nitrate.

    LLW includes the following sub-classes: Very-low-level radioactive waste (VLLW) has a low hazard potential and is above the criteria for clearance and exemption levels. Long-term waste management facilities for VLLW do not need a high degree of containment or isolation. Concentrations of longer lived radionuclides in VLLW are generally very. The report raised the following issues: (1) the potential for waste migration and groundwater contamination, (2) the adequacy of shallow land burial as a disposal method, (3) the lack of consideration of measures to minimize waste disposal, (4) the understatement of the risks of the waste stream, (5) lack of a redundant system for waste.

    environmental impact of the disposal of DU from the NEF in a low-level waste facility. At the same time DU from the NEF was not located within the classification scheme of 10 CFR so as to clarify the type of low level waste facility (Class A, B, C, or Greater-than-Class-C) it would require for its disposal. Depleted Uranium: Waste or Resource? Regulators' views are not exactly conclusive regarding this question: On Jan. 18, , the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission decided that depleted uranium is a low level waste - and the DU therefore may be transfered to DOE for disposition, as requested by the license applicant. (view details) On Sept. 26, , the Texas Department of Health approved the.


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The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Potential for Criticality Following Disposal of Uranium at Low-Level Waste Facilities [microform] Toran, L. E; U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Division of Waste Management; Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

@article{osti_, title = {The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities: Uranium blended with soil}, author = {Toran, L E and Hopper, C M and Naney, M T}, abstractNote = {The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether or not fissile uranium in low-level-waste (LLW) facilities can be concentrated by hydrogeochemical processes to permit nuclear.

Get this from a library. The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities. [L E Toran; U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Division of Waste Management.; Oak Ridge National Laboratory.;].

The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities: Uranium blended with soil Showing of pages in this report. PDF Version Also Available for by: 3. The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities: Uranium blended with soil.

By L.E. Toran, C.M. Hopper and M.T. Naney. Cite. BibTex; Full citation; Abstract. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether or not fissile uranium in low-level-waste (LLW) facilities can be concentrated by Cited by: 3. Potential for and consequences of criticality resulting from hydrogeochemically concentrated fissile uranium blended with soil in low-level waste disposal facilities Full Record Other Related Research.

@article{osti_, title = {Nuclear criticality safety assessment of the low level radioactive waste disposal facility trenches}, author = {Kahook, S D}, abstractNote = {Results of the analyses performed to evaluate the possibility of nuclear criticality in the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) trenches are documented in this report.

The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities: Uranium blended with soil Article Isotopic dilution of ²³³U with depleted uranium for.

Simultaneous hydrogeochemical and nuclear criticality studies were done (1) to identify some realistic scenarios for uranium migration and concentration increase at LLW disposal facilities, (2) to model groundwater transport and subsequent concentration via sorption or precipitation of uranium, (3) to evaluate the potential for nuclear.

Simultaneous hydrogeochemical and nuclear criticality studies were done (1) to identity realistic scenarios for uranium migration and concentration increase at LLW disposal facilities, (2) to model groundwater transport of uranium and subsequent concentration via sorption or precipitation, (3) to evaluate the potential for nuclear criticality.

NUREG/CR ORNL/TM FINAL DRAFT FOR PUBLIC COMMENT — J Emplacement Guidance for Criticality Safety in Low-Level-Waste Disposal Prepared by K. Elam, C. Hopper, C. Parks, ORNL. The Oak Ridge Y Plant initiated the Uranium Lysimeter Demonstration Project in as a critical component in the development of new disposal facilities for solid low-level waste (LLW.

PRE-PUBLICATION COPY OF FINAL REPORT ON CRITICALITY IN LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL SES Attached is the final draft (pre-publication) of "The Potential for Criticality following Disposal of Uranium at Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities." recently completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

Copies have been distributed to the Commission. Limited time offer. SAVE % on your upgrade. click here. U, as documented in NUREG/CR, “The Potential for Criticality Following Disposal of Uranium at Low-Level Waste Facilities,” Vol. The use of silicon in the analysis was significant because silicon has a very low neutron-capture cross section and silicon dioxide (sand) is often a major constituent in the soil or backfill materials.

decontamination and waste disposal. Provided that a licensee can demonstrate that the disposal of the Very Low-Level Waste (VLLW) in a hazardous or municipal solid waste landfill radiation “ results in a TEDE to an average member of the critical group that does not exceed 25 mrem ( mSv) per year.

Criticality Safety Criteria for License Review of Low-Level Waste Facilities. This study provided nuclear criticality safety levels for disposal of materials in terms of areal density (grams per square foot).

Later the NRC issued NUREG/CR, The Potential for Criticality Following Disposal of Uranium at Low-Level Waste Facilities in June Work conducted has addressed the disposal of all of the UK's higher-activity wastes in the Derived Inventory (e.g.

low-level waste destined for a GDF, intermediate-level waste, depleted, natural and low-enriched uranium, high-level waste, spent fuel (SF), plutonium (Pu) and highly-enriched uranium. NRC discusses and invites comments on regulatory framework for disposal of large amounts of depleted uranium at low-level waste facilities: The U.S.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) plans to conduct a public meeting to discuss possible revisions to the regulatory framework for the management of commercial low-level.

The potential for criticality following disposal of uranium at low-level waste facilities: Uranium blended with soil The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether or not fissile uranium in. Update: J Revision 2 of the Report, “Utah Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal License (RML UT) Condition 35 Compliance Report,” which includes responses to the Round 3 Interrogatories (as Appendix E) and responses to all other prior an aid to the reviewers, attached are redline-strikeout versions of Appendix A and those appendices that have changed.waste stream from uranium enrichment facilities warrant amending the waste classification tables in Part The model was developed to evaluate the radiological risk to potential future residents and intruders (acute or chronic exposures) near or on the land overlying a hypothetical disposal .The PEIS evaluated the potential environmental impacts associated with the disposal of depleted uranium oxide at a generic low level waste disposal facility.

Two forms of uranium oxide were considered, triuranium octaoxide (U 3 O 8) and uranium dioxide (UO 2).